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China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Fri Apr 10, 2015 7:21 pm

MIRVs/MARVs and Penetration Aids (decoys and/or chaff)

A Chinese DF-41 ICBM with 10 MIRVs/MARVs will require more than 10 defensive interceptors.

Most Chinese ballistic missiles incorporate penetration aids, such as decoys and/or chaff.

Let's conservatively assume there is one decoy for each MIRV/MARV. This means a defender needs 20 interceptors for each Chinese DF-41 ICBM missile. If there are two decoys then 30 interceptors are required.

If chaff is released judiciously throughout the terminal flight phase, it will create massive confusion. The precise location of the warheads and decoys will be hidden in a cloud of metallic chaff.

In conclusion, a DF-41 10-MIRV ICBM is a nightmare.
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DF-41: China’s Answer to the US BMD Efforts | DefenceTalk
"Nov 15, 2012 - But once the MIRV (10 warhead) capable DF-41 becomes operational, the number of warheads for this missile force would be a multiple of 10, thus quadrupling the number of interceptors required. This will get more complicated if the Chinese deploy decoys and countermeasures which would further increase required interceptor numbers. However, as discussed earlier, the improving sensor capability for Decoy-Warhead discrimination and the interceptor efficiency might reduce the number of interceptors required, negating the Chinese efforts to some extent."
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Sun Apr 19, 2015 7:02 pm

US upgrades assessment of China's Type 094 SSBN fleet - IHS Jane's 360

Image
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I am intentionally ignoring the 12 JL-1A SLBMs on the Type 092 Xia SSBN. The JL-1A has shorter range and it won't really alter the strategic thermonuclear picture.

[Note: Thank you to ChineseTiger1986 for the newslink to Jane's.]
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Tue Jun 23, 2015 11:25 am

Picture of China's DF-5 ICBM Silo

Chinese Military Modernization | IMINT & Analysis

"STRATEGIC FORCES

China's strategic nuclear deterrent relies on the use of land-based and submarine-launched nuclear missiles. A number of Harbin H-6 (BADGER) bombers, copies of the Russian Tu-16, are also in service, but their age and expansive RCS precludes them from any serious nuclear warfighting apart from use as standoff cruise missile platforms. The primary Chinese ICBM currently in service is the DF-5 (CSS-4). The DF-5 is deployed in well-concealed silos around China. The DF-5 was initially trialled at the Shuangchengzi missile test facility, being pad-launched.
...
Modern road-mobile ICBMs like the DF-31 and DF-31A are trialled at the Wuzhai test center. Wuzhai also contains an ICBM silo used for test launches of the DF-5 (CSS-4) ICBM in a manner more akin to operational employment than a Shuangchengzi pad launch. The first silo launch of a DF-5 took place at Wuzhai on the 7th of January in 1979."

The following image is an overview of the Wuzhai test facility:
Image

The following image depicts the northern launch facilities at Wuzhai, containing the DF-5 silo and a possible mobile ICBM launch pad:
Image
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According to the Pentagon 2015 Report on Chinese Military Power, the Chinese DF-5B ICBM (aka CSS-4 Mod 3) carries MIRVs.
Source (p. 8): Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2015 | Department of Defense
"...and multiple independently-targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV)-equipped Mod 3 (DF-5)"

According to expert Richard D. Fisher, China's DF-5B ICBM carries 8 MIRVs.
Source: China Increases Its Missile Forces While Opposing U.S. Missile Defense | The Heritage Foundation
"Modifying these DF-5s with an eight-warhead MIRV bus increases the number of nuclear weapons carried by its DF-5s from 26 to 208."
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Eight known Chinese DF-5A/B ICBM brigades

1. Luoning/Luoyang (804th brigade)
2. Wuzhai (Base 25)
3. Xuanhua
4. Tongdao (805th brigade)
5. Lushi (801st brigade)
6. Jingxian (803rd brigade)
7. Jingxian (814th brigade)
8. Hunan (818th brigade)

Assuming all eight brigades have been upgraded to DF-5B ICBMs (or will soon be fully upgraded in the near future):

8 DF-5B brigades x 12 DF-5B ICBMs per brigade x 8 MIRVs per DF-5B ICBM = 768 Chinese thermonuclear warheads

----------
References:

DF-5 | Federation of American Scientists
PLA Second Artillery Corps | Air Power Australia (54th and 55th bases)
MULTIMEGATON WEAPONS | Johnston Archive

Image
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Thu Sep 10, 2015 4:07 pm

China's W-88 warhead was most likely independent convergent engineering

There are two ways to develop a W-88 thermonuclear warhead.

1. You can research and develop it yourself. This is within China's capability, because it had decades of experience in miniaturization. Also, China had access to supercomputers that would allow for simulated testing of a wide variety of designs.

2. Or you can steal the design through spying. However, this is extremely unlikely. After the Rosenbergs, the US had instituted very rigorous methods to ensure security. The claim that important American classified military technology can be stolen defies credulity.

In 1999, The New York Times reported that seismic tests proved China had a W-88 thermonuclear warhead. The question is whether you believe it is method #1 or #2 (listed above). I think China developed the W-88 thermonuclear warhead design through decades of hard work.

Here's my reasoning. There are plenty of countries in the world that would love to obtain the W-88 warhead design. Why haven't they acquired it through spying? Since no other country has a comparable W-88 warhead design, it must mean that China developed theirs independently.
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BREACH AT LOS ALAMOS - A special report. - China Stole Nuclear Secrets For Bombs, U.S. Aides Say - NYTimes.com

"The evidence that so alarmed him had surfaced a year earlier. Senior nuclear weapons experts at Los Alamos poring over data from the most recent Chinese underground nuclear tests had detected eerie similarities between the latest Chinese and American bomb designs.

From what they could tell, Beijing was testing a smaller and more lethal nuclear device configured remarkably like the W-88, the most modern, minaturized warhead in the American arsenal. In April 1995 they brought their findings to Mr. Trulock.
Los Alamos scientists have access to a wide range of classified intelligence data and seismic and other measurements."

Image
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Mon Dec 21, 2015 12:57 pm

I remember doing a count of Chinese thermonuclear warheads based on the number of brigades (ie. 12 ICBMs per brigade) at Chinese missile bases. It was about 2,000 thermonuclear warheads.

I could do an estimate of China's DF-41 10-MIRV ICBM, but it would only be an educated guess. We would have to agree on the start date of Chinese DF-41 production. Next, we would have to agree on a conservative minimum estimate of one DF-41 ICBM per month.

As a benchmark, China will launch 19 orbital rockets this year. This means that China's relatively underfunded civilian space program produces the equivalent of 19 ICBMs per year. When you adjust for a significantly larger military budget and the national priority of self defense, two to three new DF-41 ICBMs produced each month seems reasonable.

It's been 3 1/2 years since the first known DF-41 ICBM launch. That's 42 months.

42 x 2 = 84 DF-41 ICBMs (probable lower bound)
42 x 3 = 126 DF-41 ICBMs (probable upper bound)

Assuming an average of 100 DF-41 ICBMs (probable middle estimate) with 10 MIRVs per missile, that's an additional 1,000 thermonuclear warheads.

I would say a reasonable and fair estimate of China's current thermonuclear arsenal is about 3,000. The only caveat is the number of DF-5A ICBMs that have been upgraded to DF-5B 8-MIRVed ICBMs. That would add a few more hundred thermonuclear warheads.

In my previous count, I had already attributed 3 MIRVs to each DF-31A ICBM (which is now called DF-31B).

The last adjustment upward is the number of JL-2 8-MIRVed SLBMs. I think the Chinese Type 094 fleet has expanded from three to five. There is a picture of the fifth Chinese Type 094 SSBN in dry dock about 1 1/2 years ago.

Lastly, you have to keep in mind that the Type 096 Tang SSBN could be undergoing sea trials. There is a lag of a few years before China reveals its latest military hardware. The Type 096 SSBN is expected to carry 18-24 SLBMs with longer range (e.g. possibly JL-3 with 10 MIRVs).

Anyway, I don't keep a precise count because everyone knows China can destroy the United States in a thermonuclear counter-strike.
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The number of Russian and American thermonuclear warheads is inflated by tiny tactical thermonuclear warheads. A more apt comparison is strategic thermonuclear warheads that can launch from one continent to strike another.

When you consider only strategic warheads, the number of thermonuclear warheads between Russia, China, and the US is actually fairly close.

Let's face it, B-52s are not survivable. They're useless in a superpower fight. Non-stealthy and subsonic B-52s really can't deliver their thermonuclear payload. A megaton-class EMP would bring down the entire B-52 fleet.
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby billz » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:34 am

> would say a reasonable and fair estimate of China's current thermonuclear arsenal is about 3,000. The only caveat is the number of DF-5A ICBMs that have been upgraded to DF-5B 8-MIRVed ICBMs. That would add a few more hundred thermonuclear warheads.


the 3,000 number is certainly within the ballpark of the true figure.
a few years ago, a professor with his students made a documentary
about china's 2nd artillery division's 3,000km underground network
and mentioned around 2,500.
the usa's dod has always quoted around 200-300, which is ridiculous.
i guess they wanted to make china look weak.
however, using logic alone, one could figure out the approx #.
the usa and soviet/russia has over 5,000 due to each country not only
has to prepare to fight at 2 fronts, eg. usa: russia and china, russia:usa/eu
and china, jp.. and certainly china has more than 2: usa, russia, india, jp..
it's only logical china has similar#, which im not even surprised if they
in fact has +5,000.
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US aimed to nuke civilian populations in enemy cities during

Postby billz » Thu Dec 24, 2015 7:53 am

US aimed to nuke civilian populations in enemy cities during Cold War – declassified document

A newly released Cold War-era list of nuclear targets shows the US planned to inflict “systematic destruction” on enemy cities and target the “population” of those areas. It is the most comprehensive Cold War nuclear target list to become declassified.

The Strategic Air Command (SAC) Atomic Weapons Requirements Study for 1959, produced in June 1956, was published by the National Security Archive on Tuesday.
Read more
Russian President Vladimir Putin during an interview with Rossiya 1 TV anchor Vladimir Solovyov © Aleksey Nikolskyi West fears recreation of Soviet Union, despite nobody planning one – Putin

Totaling almost 800 pages, the document details targets in over 1,200 cities, including Moscow, Beijing, and Warsaw. The list for each city contains details on targeting the population, along with industrial and infrastructural targets.

Moscow and Leningrad were marked as priority one and two, respectively. Moscow had 179 Designated Ground Zeros (DGZs), while Leningrad had 145, in addition to “population” targets. In both cities, the list identified air power installations such as Soviet Air Force command centers, which the US would have demolished with thermonuclear weapons early in the war.

The document also includes lists of more than 1,100 airfields in the Soviet bloc, with a priority number assigned to each base. The Soviet bomber force was the highest priority for nuclear testing, and the list labels Bykhov and Orsha airfields, both located in Belorussia, as priority one and two, respectively. Medium-range Badger (TU-16) bombers, which would have posed a threat to the US and NATO allies, were present at both bases.

Soviet airfields were to be targeted with bombs ranging from 1.7 to 9 megatons, which were capable of inflicting heavy damage. The US also hailed the necessity of a 60-megaton bomb (4,000 times larger than the Hiroshima bomb's 15 kilotons), which was capable of delivering “significant results” in the event of war with the Soviet bloc.

The National Security Archive, based at George Washington University, obtained the nuclear target list through the Mandatory Declassification Review (MDR) process.

rt.com/news/326879-cold-war-nuclear-list/
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby billz » Fri Dec 25, 2015 7:31 am

on the link posted above about w-88
http://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/06/world ... gewanted=2

most ppl do not understand that it is about math!
for example, for 1 launch of a soyuz, shenzhou, or usa's space shuttle (now retired) all
of them required the branch of math called operations research, or specifically, decision science.
in other words, even though all of them are run independently, if you were to visit
those centers, at the core, all of them have similar characteristics as they all employ
mathematicians to figure out all the logistics and optimization of operations and
the management of the launch!
google the image of w-88, it is about math! it is about how you would optimize
the 3-D form so that it can pack the most amount of smaller weapons inside the head!
it uses calculus, in fact it needs supercomputers to figure it out as it requires
tens or hundreds of unknowns in equations.
when china built its own supercomputers in the late 1980s it began to calculate
the optimization and miniaturization of its weapons!
(google: "hu side" weapon miniaturization)

the fact that china's own weapons, as they say, look similar to usa's w-88 is because
of math!!! -- but just because china later on may or may not have obtained usa's w-88
through intelligence, it has nothing to do with its own design. both countries
derived their own designs using math! and that's why they look similar!
math is king and universal.
Last edited by billz on Fri Dec 25, 2015 7:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby billz » Fri Dec 25, 2015 7:44 am

Associated Press
May 29, 2001

Government Holds Back Scientist's Book
By Richard Benke

Albuquerque, NM -- A retired Los Alamos scientist, who spent the last decade studying China's nuclear programs, is fighting federal interference in his efforts to publish a book on his meetings with Chinese scientists and visits to their secret facilities.

Dan Stillman's manuscript has been under review for 1-1/2 years at the Energy Department, Defense Department and CIA, said Mark Zaid, Stillman's attorney. Pentagon and Energy Department spokeswomen confirm the review continues.

Fellow scientists and Zaid say it's time Stillman's story - based on a decade of visiting China's most secret facilities - moves off the government shelf and onto people's bookshelves.

"I just don't see why they don't let him publish," said Harold Agnew, a former Los Alamos National Laboratory director who said he looks forward to reading the book.

Neither Zaid nor any publisher has been allowed to see the book, "Inside China's Nuclear Weapons Program."

Zaid expects to sue by mid-June alleging First Amendment abuses. Air Force Lt. Col. Willette Carter said the Pentagon declines to comment since a lawsuit hasn't been filed.

Asked why the government was blocking publication, Agnew said: "It may well be they're just embarrassed."

"The government's attempt to suppress an entire 500-page manuscript is intolerable to anyone who cares about the First Amendment," said Steven Aftergood, director of the Federation of American Scientists' Project on Government Secrecy. "He has every right to tell his story."

Stillman, 67, retired at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1993.

Robert Vrooman, former Los Alamos counterintelligence director, said he helped debrief Stillman after some of the China travel.

"It was my impression that (debriefers) were very happy with what he was getting," Vrooman said.

Stillman said he's among only five Americans allowed to visit both the Chinese nuclear test site and nuclear weapons lab.

"I simply asked questions, and they seemed happy to answer," Stillman said of his 10 visits to China from 1990 to 2001.

"Everything I brought back in my notes was unclassified," he said, suggesting "the U.S. intelligence community" later imposed "a very high classification level in order to control the information."

China, among other things, wanted to convey a message to Americans, including congressional figures who accused China of espionage, he said.

"I wish I could testify before your U.S. Congress to tell them how much damage has been done," Hu Side, former head of China's nuclear weapons program, said in a 1999 speech attended by Stillman. "They have turned cooperation into conflict! I could tell them the truth, that we never found it necessary to steal any U.S. nuclear weapon secrets."

Referring to certain U.S. officials, excluding Stillman, as "you," Hu went on: "You have overestimated the scientific and technical capability of the U.S. and seriously underestimated that of China. You have insulted us. You must have made these (espionage) charges for political reasons and not on the basis of evidence of what we have done. We never learned anything from you. ... We did not need you!"



///billz' comment: in another article, either nytimes or washingtonpost but i cannot find it now or too lazy to
refine my search, dr.hu's told the story that once china built its own supercomputer in the late 80's the scientists
then went back to their archives of designs of previous years - shelved due to lack of computational tools - and then
using the supercomp, they were able to fed the equations and came up with weapons miniaturization!




He added Wen Ho Lee, former scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, "is a scapegoat."

Taiwan-born Lee, a U.S. citizen, was freed last September after pleading guilty to one charge of illegal data downloading at the lab. The government dropped 58 charges.

The FBI had listed Lee's acquaintance with Hu as one of several reasons for keeping Lee jailed without bail.

Asked if he believed China never stole U.S. secrets, Stillman said: "Of course. Out of 1.3 billion people, it's certainly possible to find some really brilliant scientists that can develop their own nuclear weapons program without having to steal it from the U.S. I've never understood why some people in the U.S. think that we are the only intelligent people in the world."


Some suggested China's progress making smaller, "miniaturized" bombs came via espionage. Others argued it arrived with supercomputer access in the 1990s. But Agnew, the third director of the Los Alamos lab, said China could have succeeded without supercomputers.

"Absolutely," Agnew said. "We did."

fas.org/sgp/news/2001/05/ap052901.html
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Fri Dec 25, 2015 11:05 am

Comparing American and Chinese strategic thermonuclear warheads

By February 2018, the United States is only permitted to have 1,550 strategic thermonuclear warheads. Due to a definition quirk, a bomber counts as "one" thermonuclear warhead.

1,550 thermonuclear warheads - 77 B-52H bombers - 68 B-1B bombers - 20 B-2A bombers = 1,385 thermonuclear warheads

I subtracted out the American bombers, because I don't think they can reach their targets (due to EMP vulnerability).

With 1,385 strategic thermonuclear warheads under a verifiable New START treaty, the US has to divide its arsenal into two to simultaneously strike continent-sized Russia and China.

1,385 / 2 = 693 thermonuclear warheads aimed by the US at China
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Now, let's look at how many Chinese strategic warheads are aimed at the US in a counter-strike.

Eight known Chinese DF-5A/B ICBM brigades

1. Luoning/Luoyang (804th brigade)
2. Wuzhai (Base 25)
3. Xuanhua
4. Tongdao (805th brigade)
5. Lushi (801st brigade)
6. Jingxian (803rd brigade)
7. Jingxian (814th brigade)
8. Hunan (818th brigade)

Assuming all eight brigades have been upgraded to DF-5B ICBMs (or will soon be fully upgraded in the near future):

8 DF-5B brigades x 12 DF-5B ICBMs per brigade x 8 MIRVs per DF-5B ICBM = 768 Chinese thermonuclear warheads from DF-5B ICBMs

Seven known Chinese DF-31A ICBM brigades

1. Delingha
2. Haiyan
3. Datong (809 Brigade)
4. Tainshui (812 Brigade)
5. Xixia
6. Shaoyang (805 Brigade)
7. Yuxi

7 DF-31A brigades x 12 ICBMs per brigade x 3 MIRVs per DF-31A ICBM = 252 thermonuclear warheads from DF-31A ICBMs

Five Chinese Type 094 SSBNs

The fifth Chinese Type 094 SSBN was seen in dry dock about 1 1/2 years ago. It should be operational by now.

5 Type 094 SSBNs x 12 JL-2 SLBMs per Type 094 SSBN x 8 MIRVs per JL-2 SLBM = 480 thermonuclear warheads from JL-2 SLBMs

China should have produced 100 DF-41 ICBMs during the past 42 months

It's been 3 1/2 years since the first known DF-41 ICBM launch. That's 42 months.

42 x 2 = 84 DF-41 ICBMs (probable lower bound)
42 x 3 = 126 DF-41 ICBMs (probable upper bound)

Assuming an average of 100 DF-41 ICBMs (probable middle estimate) with 10 MIRVs per missile, that's an additional 1,000 thermonuclear warheads on DF-41 ICBMs.

Adding up all of China's strategic thermonuclear warheads.

DF-5B thermonuclear warheads: 768
DF-31A thermonuclear warheads: 252
JL-2 thermonuclear warheads: 480
DF-41 thermonuclear warheads: 1,000

In total, China should presently have about 2,500 strategic thermonuclear warheads.

China should have 3 1/2 times more strategic thermonuclear warheads aimed at the US than vice versa. However, a thermonuclear war is unwinnable. 693 thermonuclear explosions plus radioactive fallout would render China unrecognizable.

China technically should have significantly more strategic thermonuclear warheads than the US, but Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) would ensure their non-use. It is illogical and completely insane for one mature thermonuclear power to launch a nuke war against another mature thermonuclear power.
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Fri Dec 25, 2015 3:54 pm

The 294 megaton estimate is about 10 to 15 years old.

Let's calculate a current estimate.

DF-5B thermonuclear warheads: 768
DF-31A thermonuclear warheads: 252
JL-2 thermonuclear warheads: 480
DF-41 thermonuclear warheads: 1,000

Each DF-5B warhead is a half-megaton. Eight DF-5B warheads equal 4 megatons. The original DF-5A had a single five-megaton warhead. There are eight DF-5B brigades. Each brigade has 12 ICBMs. The sum of 96 DF-5B ICBMs contains 384 megatons.

There are seven DF-31A brigades. Each brigade has 12 ICBMs. There are a total of 84 DF-31A ICBMs. Each DF-31A can carry a single one-megaton warhead or three smaller ones. An estimate of the total DF-31A megatonnage is 84 megatons.

There are five Type 094 SSBNs. Each JL-2 SLBM can carry a one-megaton warhead or eight smaller warheads. An estimate of the total JL-2 megatonnage is: 5 Type 094 SSBNs x 12 JL-2 SLBMs x one megaton = 60 megatons

There should be about 100 DF-41 ICBMs. China has already conducted five tests, so you know China has a lot of them. Also, we've seen pictures of DF-41 ICBMs coming out of the manufacturing plant or being tested on an angled speed track.

100 DF-41 ICBMs with a one-megaton warhead or ten smaller warheads. An estimate of the total DF-41 ICBM yield is 100 megatons.

Let's add up all of the megatons.

DF-5B: 384 megatons
DF-31A: 84 megatons
JL-2: 60 megatons
DF-41: 100 megatons

A contemporary estimate of China's total strategic megatonnage is 628 megatons.
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Mon Dec 28, 2015 7:24 am

Correcting DF-41 ICBM 10-MIRV warhead yield to 225 kilotons each

I underestimated the yield of China's new DF-41 ICBM with 10 MIRVs.

I had used an estimate of 100 kilotons per warhead. That is incorrect. According to The Diplomat, the proper yield is 150 kilotons to 300 kilotons per warhead.

I took the average to reach a 225 kiloton yield for each DF-41 ICBM MIRV warhead.

This means each DF-41 ICBM carries a total of 2.25 megatons (not the one megaton that I assumed earlier).

China Tests New Missile Capable of Hitting Entire United States | The Diplomat

Image
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Here is my revised estimate of China's total yield from its strategic thermonuclear warheads.

DF-5B: 384 megatons
DF-31B: 84 megatons
JL-2: 60 megatons
DF-41: 225 megatons

The best estimate of China's total megatonnage from strategic thermonuclear warheads is 753 megatons.
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Re: China's 294 Megatons of Thermonuclear Firepower

Postby Martin Su » Sat Nov 04, 2017 1:05 am

China displayed 16 new DF-31AG 3-MIRV ICBMs at July 30, 2017 parade | Jane's

According to Jane's, China showed 16 of its new DF-31AG 3-MIRV ICBMs to the world on July 30, 2017 (see article below).

The DF-31AG has a range of 11,200 km, which means it can hit the entire United States.

DF-31AG Intercontinental ballistic missile | Military Today

"A total of 16 DF-31AG launchers with missiles were publicly presented during this parade. Such appearance of numerous missiles indicates that the DF-31AG is already in service with Second Artillery Corps, that are de facto strategic missile forces of Chinese army. Currently it is among the deadliest ICBMs in the world.
...
Once on high alert the road-mobile DF-31AG missiles can leave their bases and operate in remote areas. Its autonomy allows the vehicle to operate undetected in an area equivalent to a small European country. Such mobile missiles are typically harder to intercept than stationary silo-based missiles. As a result these have a high probability of surviving the first strike once the country has been attacked."

The family of Chinese ICBMs and SLBMs is expanding.

DF-5A ICBM: Single Five Megaton warhead
DF-5B: Ten MIRVs
DF-31: Single warhead
DF-31A: Three MIRVs
DF-31AG: Three MIRVs with extended range (distinguished by eight-wheel TEL with missile abutting driver cabin)
DF-41: Twelve MIRVs

JL-2 SLBM: 8 MIRVs (according to Jane's)
JL-3 SLBM: Navalized DF-41 ICBM with 12 MIRVs (in development)
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DF-31AG ICBM can carry multiple warheads, claims China’s state media | Jane's

Image
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Image
The DF-31AG TEL (shown in picture) carries the missile behind the driver's cabin. In contrast, the longer DF-41 ICBM missile extends beyond the front of its TEL driver-cabin. The TEL has eight wheels for both the DF-31AG and DF-41.
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At eight seconds into the video below, the first eight TELs are regular DF-31A ICBMs (which has shorter range). The front of the DF-31A ICBM canister is located about ten feet behind the driver cabin.

In contrast, DF-31AG ICBMs can be seen 24 seconds into the video. The front of the canister for the DF-31AG ICBM is almost flush against the back of the driver cabin.

VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0DymIJERsc
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